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Developing High-Performance Work Teams
Edited by Steven D. Jones and Michael M. Beyerlein

"From Supervisor to Team Manager" is a case study by Allen Ferguson, Amy Hicks, and Steven D. Jones. It can be found in the book Developing High-Performance Work Teams edited by Steven D. Jones and Michael M. Beyerlein. It involves the Eastman Chemical Company of Kingsport, Tennessee and their 1989 decision to move to team management at the Kingsport headquarters. It illustrates an inside view as to how a traditional supervisor was transformed into a team leader, by overcoming barriers and going through critical training. This study provides landmarks in the development process of a team leader, and other supervisors going through the process may recognize the stages. It also provides information on the impact this change had on the entire organization.

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"How Self-Managed Sales Teams Led to Better Sales in a British Company" is a case study by Roger Woodgate of ABA Consultants, and Niall Trafford and Angela Stephens of Marks & Spence. This case study details the implementation of teams as part of a change to an empowered work culture at Mark & Spence, a global retail organization. They created a selling culture where every sales assistant is allowed to anticipate and respond to customer needs while implementing their own ideas about improving sales. This study illustrates their pilot program and its problems and outcomes, as well as the organizational impact this transition affected.

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"Organizational Transformation for Effectively Implementing a Team-Based Culture" is a case study by Ed Rose, Steve Gilmore and Ray D. Odom. It involves the Harris Semiconductor manufacturing company and their strategy for managing change during team implementation and sets a standard for a proactive approach to change. The study includes the four stage model that recognizes how psychological reaction to change can be managed.

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"Operational Excellence" is a case study by Berkeley J. Emmons which discusses the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce and their implementation of teams viewed as a planned organizational change. They began teams during reorganization and downsizing and the case study includes the results of this process.

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"Are those Team Meetings Gonna Make You Money?" is a case study by Stephen D. Hill. This study discusses the implications of creating teams because of economic hardship, and how one cross-functional team actually went to the customer to increase sales. This study details their training and formation and the results of their efforts.

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"The Facilitatorís Role in Team Breakthroughs" is a case study by R. Glenn Ray and Karen Stapleton which explores the BorgWarner Automotive company of Gallipolis, Ohio, and the effect of a facilitator had on teams and the organization as a whole. Included in the study, are examples of barriers to team implementation, the development of the facilitator, including some of the techniques used.

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"Integrated Health-Care Support Teams" is a case study by Carrie McHale. In this study, the implications of integrating formerly separate hospital departments and the development of teams during reorganization are discussed. The different training efforts that were utilized are detailed, and the cost savings by the organization are included.

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"Building a Team Measurement and Feedback System to Drive Performance" is a case study by Don Schilling. The American Paper Company developed a process to measure the performance of their teams. The performance measure, in the form of scorecards, are aligned with the company objectives and provide a vehicle for feedback, goal setting and problem solving to drive performance improvements. The study includes information on all of these issues, their enhancements, and the results of these techniques.

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"Strategic Planning and Performance Measurement in an Academic Team" is a case study by Beverly G. Burke, Sharon L. Wagner, and Judith L. Van Hein. This study was performed at Middle Tennessee State University, and describes how a team in an academic setting developed its own performance measures, and the efforts and results over a four-year period.

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"Reach Out and Touch Your Team: Development of a High-Performing Virtual Team" is a case study by Matthew J. Ferrero and Donna Lewis. This case details the building of a virtual team for the Internal Revenue Service and the issues associated with having a team spread out 800 miles. This study also discusses the leadership issues and measures.

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"Developing an Empowered Work Team" is a case study by Bob Carroll. This study discusses the 1987 development of an empowered cross-functional team, through management intervention. It describes the actual interventions used during critical times during a five-year period and the major improvements that were made to produce an exceptional product from a troubled one.

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"Cross-Functional Support Teams in a Manufacturing Environment" is a case study by Diane Hertel and Susan Schober Murray. In this study, the restrictive union agreements, hierarchical management structure, and obsolete equipment and systems were part of a problem that was solved when the company relocated and instigated cross-functional support teams. This study includes the definition and design of the teams as well as a case example.

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"High Performance Teams in the Construction Industry" is a case study by Kathleen Chapman and GiGi Gerson which  involves the BE&K Construction company and their problem of locating enough qualified workers. One of the challenges of developing high-performance work teams is that these workers are only hired for the duration of a project, usually 6 to 24 months. To combat these problems, BE&K decided to design a high-performance work team model specifically for BE&K Construction. This study illustrates the effectiveness of the team, its necessary modifications and its implementation on a larger project.

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"TwinStar, an International Joint Venture" is a case study by Ronald Shenberger. In this study, Hitachi, a Japanese company, and Texas Instruments, a US company, form a joint venture into the semiconductor industry and implement work teams. Culture, leadership, recruitment and selection, and training are all issues addressed, as is the concept of Total Quality Management. Attrition is still a problem faced by the company.

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